Raducanu Sympathizes with Snigur, Focused on Comeback Trail

Raducanu Sympathizes with Snigur, Focused on Comeback Trail

Emma Raducanu will shove sentimentality to one side in Nottingham on Thursday as she faces the Ukrainian Daria Snigur, someone she grew up facing in juniors and who has spoken of how much she misses her home in Kyiv.

Raducanu wants to extend her stay at the Wimbledon warm-up event but her second-round clash with Snigur, ranked 127th in the world, will be tricky. 

The 21-year-old Briton will try to focus on herself as she said: ‘I remember playing her at the Under-12s Winter Cup in Romania. She’s a very unorthodox opponent to play. Someone with amazing hand skills. Really good at deflecting pace. Really good at making me move. She’s someone I grew up playing with in juniors.

‘But I haven’t actually spent that much time on the court with her. She makes life very difficult for her opponents and it’s important that I focus on my end of the court. It’s very easy to get frustrated but I’m looking forward to playing and I feel good in myself.’

Emma Raducanu promised to shove sentimentality to one side at the Nottingham Open on Thursday as she faces the Ukrainian Daria Snigur in the second round of the competition

Raducanu expressed her sympathy for Snigur, who now lives in Poland because of the dangers in her homeland, but outlined her focus on winning as she continues on her comeback trail

Raducanu expressed her sympathy for Snigur, who now lives in Poland because of the dangers in her homeland, but outlined her focus on winning as she continues on her comeback trail

On facing a Ukrainian who now lives in Poland because of the dangers in her homeland, Raducanu said: ‘It’s not an easy situation at all. I do sympathise for her, for having to go through that. At the end of the day, when we’re on the court, it’s two people trying to beat each other and there’s nothing more to it.’

Snigur added: ‘I am living in Warsaw, Poland. I love Kyiv and I want to go back after the war. I miss my home so much. It’s not so easy to get back. I must take the train from Warsaw to Kyiv, it’s two days. I know that if I want to go home, I must do this. Did I feel safe? No. It’s not so good. We don’t have safe places in Ukraine now.’

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